Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
STATION
CSPAN 6
CNNW 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
CNBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the religious right was provoked into politics. the tradition among many protestants was political quietism. and then the supreme court decided that the constitution required that there be at exclusion of religion from the public square in the removal of prayer from schools. deeply offended a great many americans. 40 years ago, next month, they delivered the final provocation for the legitimate political purpose of trying to save the
every religion and culture has one thing in common, a doomsday scenario. do you think that's why so many people take these predictions seriously? >> listen, you said it right there. every religion no matter what they disagree on has the end of the world moment. almost every one of them. the answer is oddly in the fine print. that's the interesting part. who knows what will be next. there will be one that's next. i don't think it is because religion tells us. but we don't want to feel like we are a dumb animal that gets wiped out. we see it as judgment. that's what you see in religions. we want to feel someone is out there. there is nothing wrong with feeling like we are not alone in the universe. why do we keep looking to this disaster and why will there be another? we just want to feel like we are not alone. the only thing you don't want to see is people being taken advantage of for that. >> there are several more doomsday predictions in the near future i'm sure will get as much hype as the dateses get closer. why do you think people are so fascinated. even when this one didn't pan out
of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant victory for the muslim brotherhood, was this silent majority that was speaking? >> i
to cling to their guns and religion, and now in november we saw him wanting to cling to the votes of the people who cling to their votes and their religion. we saw shootings in the midst of this campaign, don. we saw the aurora shooting, we saw the sikh temple shooting, happened smack in the middle of this campaign, and this issue, not be discussed, not be debated in what was a very long and testy, heated campaign. so i don't think it's true, or right to say it's the democrats or the republicans. what we cannot have is a conversation where we're blaming each other. where the media is blaming the guns, where the gun industry is blaming the liberals, where the liberals are blaming the violent video games. we have to have a comprehensive conversation, and it be a constructive conversation. not one where people are trying to escape their responsibility and blame it on some other industry or some other faction. >> well, i think in your -- >> well, i -- >> in your response, there's a different between democratic and republican lawmakers. i will agree with you republicans who are lawmake
of religion and the right to practice how we choose. and according to some of this year's recent polls, nearly 60% of the general public finding religion very important in their life. you can look at this poll here on your screen. and our next guest has spent some time reflecting both about faith and politics. fox news contributor juan williams is with us from dc with his analysis. good morning to you. >> good morning, ainsley. merry christmas. >> ainsley: merry christmas to you. so i recently was watching one of the morning shows and i saw joel osteen, the pastor from texas, being interviewed by a local morning anchor and he was asking about his faith and he said -- and then about politics. and he said i try not to talk about politics because it divides people. but you, juan, you have a way -- i know you're very faithful, but you also talk about politics and it's injure job. so how do you set faith into -- fit faith into politics? >> for the whole of america and american politics, religion is oftentimes been i think a centerpoint and not always positive, which is why i hesitated and some pol
. they should be able to train without having religion forced on them. joining me with reaction is executive director for the dr. ron cruise who is a retired army chaplain. good morning to you, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we see a situation in west point. one cadet who was an athiest felt uncomfortable with taking part in involuntary prayer, your reaction. >> it is a shame we don't respect the pluralism. can prayer in west point went back from the founding of our country and we need to respect the religious beliefs of all. those who believe and those who don'tment those who believe have every right to prayer and those who don't believe opt out of the prayer. we need to remember that our founding fathers, george washington upon his appointment as commander-in-chief in the army. one of his first acts was to ask congress to authorize chaplains in every brigade so that religious services could be held. prayer is fundament will in the lives of our soldiers from the beginning of our country and west point would do well to resist efforts by athleast advocates. >> i read a portion
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
. according to tradition. as religion correspondent lauren green reports some scholars have a different take. ♪ ♪ >> christians from every background acknowledge bethlehem the birthplace of jesus. >> why call it jesus of nazareth? >> it was based on the earlier tradition that jesus had born there. >> we visited the church of the nativity built by the emperor constantine in iv century. >> why go to a cave to have a baby? well, luke tells us they laid him in a manger because there was no room in the inn. greek word is cataloma and that the guest house is full no, privacy. rather than give birth if guest room they take hor to the cave where things are quiet. >> many scholars believe jesus was born in nazareth. >> can anything good come from nazareth? jesus is from nazareth. the statement can anything good come from nazareth assumes he's from nazareth. >> that didn't make sense. they remind the readership he was born in bethlehem. >> book of luke says in the pregnancy, mary and joseph travelled to bethlehem to register for roman census. and angel reassured joseph he should take mary as his w
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
of religion, says it only applies to certain entities. it doesn't. and the idea that congress here, through the president's plan, has burdened the religious exercise of hobby lobby to the point where they're being compelled to violate their conscience, i can't imagine the founders would have thought that to be a very good idea. again, i go back to the basic point. all they had to do was keep a status quo here. >> kelly: that's a very good point here 'cause they're facing a million dollars in fines every day and they provide a lot of employment. what happens to a company like this because they're standing on their faith principles? >> eric: it's a tough call. it's like chick-fil-a, the same thing. the difference with that is that people came and said we're going to support chick-fil-a. they got that support. this is a big one because if hobby lobby wins this, they probably already lost it, but if they somehow prevail in the courts, there are a lot of faith-based companies, founders of companies that would like to do the same. the question is, will there be anyone else besides churches and re
," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright recounts her childhood in czechoslovakia during the nazi invasion in "prague winter." in bill veeck, paul dickson details the life of the advocate for racial equality and players' economic rights. damien ec cols in "life after death." for an extended links of various publications' 2012 notable book
free speech rights in the first amendment. why wouldn't they have the free exercise of religion rights that are also in fact, they start the first amendment as the religious -- i think it's a very important point to make that though hobby lobby has had a tough time taking this to get the preliminary injunction, nothing has been decided on the merits. we actually just won yesterday in 7th court of appeals. our client. corporation. not a religious organization. a regular company. they got the injunction, we have done that for two other of our clients we're 3 for 3. the judges matter in this situation who you get before you this is important precedent. how many companies might have an objection to providing the morning after pill. what justice society to my your said they are not religious organizations. how do you get around that burden? >> i think you get around the burden by saying forever legal purposes this is not a fun term for people and it's true. this is how the law works. when you look at the law really holding here it's the first amendment. really the religious freedom restorat
of religion. they are inalienable and it is unfathomable to us that there are parts of the world where they don't believe that. it's amazing, but true. how far do we go in pushing what we believe to be universal rights when we know we're going to get some kind of negative reaction? i mean, can we be tough or russia because they're less important to us than say, china or saudi arabia? >> i think the russians would like us to be tougher. what is quite interesting is that vladimir putin might have stepped out too far on this issue. there are 600,000 orphans in russia right now which is more than they had during the time of world war ii. now, oftentimes the russians and russian public opinion can be quite anti-american except in this case almost 40% of russians actually support the act which when you consider it it's not a majority, but coming from a country that's often anti-american and public opinion that's really significant. >> when putin was signing the thing he said, so what if the living standards in other countries are better than ours? so what? i don't care. should we all move th
refer to religion things in code and jesus was the partridge in a pear tree. >> bill: i was supposed to know that? what an uplifting christmas question when henry the eighth was beheading all the catholics they thought jesus was a bird so they could live. and a merry christmas to you, doocy. >> thanks very much. >> bill o'reilly, thank you very much. >> any time. >> steve: for gracing us with your wisdom. >> brian: that is so fantastic. >> gretchen: so great he wasn't out of character. >> merry christmas. >> brian: same character in the hallway or office. >> steve: usually at 9:00 eastern time. ali over to you. >> alisyn: voices of rise into the heavens these teenagers are keeping the tradition of gospel music alive. we are joined gospel for teens and program director. it's great to have all of you here today. >> thank you. >> alisyn: thanks so much for being with us. >> it's so exciting. >> alisyn: wait until everyone hears your beautiful voices we will get to that in a second. i want to talk to you about the program. you stated that the goal is to bring gospel into the lives of kid
of the three, main religions. >> reporter: it's so politically charged. >> so politically charged. >> reporter: discovered by accident in the 19th century, when an archaeologist was walking his dog. this massive network of caves and tunnels is known as solomon's quarry. king solomon is the founding father of the free masons. >> reporter: the reminder of solomon, his temple and his construction, seems to seep from these walls. tears of the king. >> the tears of the king. >> reporter: why is he crying? >> well, this was the end of the first temple period. >> reporter: it was under zedekiah rule that jerusalem fell to the babylonians. the temple was destroyed. and the ark of the covenant went missing from both history and the pages of the bible. >> the last time anybody really sees it, according to the biblical tradition. >> reporter: many believe these underground tunnels were used to secretly transport the ark out of jerusalem. and when the babylonian troops took inventory of the treasures they had plundered, something was missing. >> there are other stories that maybe someone spirited the ark
. [applause] >> tonight, religion and politics with analyst george will. followed by a discussion on climate science and politics. and later, james hansen. >> tomorrow on washington journal, we will talk about the latest on the fiscal cliff with a columnist. that is followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
should extend discrimination law, or you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we would get these cases and resolve them in terms of a particular liberal or conservative political agenda. there are ways of characterizing us that make more sense in terms of what we do. some of my colleagues prefer to adhere strictly to that text of the statute. others of my colleagues look more expensively to what we call the legislative history of the background of the statute, or a purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of those think it is important what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it. others on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. those sorts of things make sense. it is easier, i think, for court reporters to say that justice is liberal and that justice is conservative, and i do not think it is helpful in looking at what we do. >> let me switch to a question about -- more int
and various cities, there's no room for kids and not even a thought process. let's face it, religion is on the slide in terms of the major politics are in the newspaper. let's talk about those. >> i'm not a regulation man but we are fooling with the cycle of life. the cycle of life means you replace yourself for the next generation. western economies rely on growth. you stop growing, you're like a sha shark, you die, we need to do that for the debts we're piling up. what fuels growth is the next generation of young workerings. young workers are not coming into the workforce. look at southern europe with youth unemployment. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. an
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)